Difference between revisions of "The Cutting Room Floor:About"

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(What we want)
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#* Things normally accessible but invisible in normal play (e.g. offscreen)
 
#* Things normally accessible but invisible in normal play (e.g. offscreen)
 
#* Use common sense.
 
#* Use common sense.
 
A good question to ask yourself before contributing something is "is this already on GameFAQs?" If the answer is yes, it probably doesn't belong here. A lot of seemingly "secret" codes fall under this category. (Yes, the original Cutting Room Floor had a few of these. The rules were a bit looser then.)
 
  
 
When in doubt, ask. Eventually categorization is planned so that games will be categorized based on what kind of information they have, making more trivial inclusions possible.
 
When in doubt, ask. Eventually categorization is planned so that games will be categorized based on what kind of information they have, making more trivial inclusions possible.

Revision as of 07:17, 8 February 2010

The Cutting Room Floor is the update to BMF54123's original page. The Wiki was chosen because it's far easier to maintain and takes a lot of the workload out of managing updates ourselves.


What we want

For something to be here, it has to fall under one of the following criteria:

  1. The content is included in the data, but remains unused in the final version. This includes:
    • Graphics
    • Text
    • Sounds or music
    • Gameplay or test modes
    • Other data, such as levels or players
  2. The content is in the final, but requires a modified program or data to unlock
  3. The content is in the final, but requires an unknown or little-known code to access it
  4. The content is sufficiently interesting, such as
    • Developer's easter eggs
    • Things normally accessible but invisible in normal play (e.g. offscreen)
    • Use common sense.

When in doubt, ask. Eventually categorization is planned so that games will be categorized based on what kind of information they have, making more trivial inclusions possible.