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Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney

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Title Screen

Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney

Also known as: Gyakuten Saiban: Yomigaeru Gyakuten (JP)
Developer: Capcom
Publisher: Capcom
Platform: Nintendo DS
Released in JP: September 15, 2005
Released in US: October 11, 2005
Released in EU: March 31, 2006
Released in AU: March 8, 2009


DevTextIcon.png This game has hidden development-related text.
GraphicsIcon.png This game has unused graphics.
MusicIcon.png This game has unused music.
RegionIcon.png This game has regional differences.


So very stubbly.
This page is rather stubbly and could use some expansion.
Are you a bad enough dude to rescue this article?

Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney is an enhanced remake of the first game in the Japan-only Gyakuten Saiban ("Turnabout Trial") Game Boy Advance visual novel trilogy. You follow the novice lawyer Phoenix Wright and his quest for great justice, facing Japan's Los Angeles' corrupt law system. Instant success and sequels ensued. It also added an additional chapter using the Apollo Justice engine.

Notably, it also made the game far easier than in the GBA version, where the save file created upon quitting the game was a temporary, single-use one: Screw up once, and you lose the whole case. Realism at its finest.

Unused Graphics

Hmmm...
To do:
What English demo? Also, compare the ending screen graphics with the one in the Japanese kiosk demo.

Ace attorney1 Demo end.png

The ending screen for the English demo.


Phoenix-Wright-AA-DS-Placeholder-Blood-1.png Phoenix-Wright-AA-DS-Placeholder-Blood-2.png Phoenix-Wright-AA-DS-Placeholder-Blood-3.png Phoenix-Wright-AA-DS-Placeholder-Blood-4.png Phoenix-Wright-AA-DS-Placeholder-Blood-5.png

Five placeholder icons for pieces of evidence. Each one says "bloodstain".

Unused Animations

Phoenix-hearts.gif

An unused sprite of Phoenix "in love" can be found in the game's graphic files. This was most likely meant to be used when Phoenix sees April May on the stand for the first time. However, because Phoenix first meets her during the investigation, using this would not have made sense. It was featured in the gallery in Gyakuten Saiban Jiten, an encyclopedia cartridge bundled with the Japanese release of the fourth game.


Edgeworth-damage-extra.gif

An unused sprite of Edgeworth taking damage, analogous to his equivalent in-court animation. It seems that it was simply never put to use, for reasons unknown; it would have fit various situations in the game.

Larry-extra.gif

An unused sprite of Larry seemingly surprised, shouting, or both. Why they created this animation is anyone's guess.


(Source: Court Records)

Unused Music

The unused music from the original game is also present here. Unlike all the other music, it was not upgraded for the DS.

Save Data Version Info

Like in the original game, there is some version info that is used in the save data. It is unknown if the version info is for the save format or the game. Unlike in the original game, the text differs between versions.

Version Text
Japan, Japan Kiosk Demo
2005 CAPCOM DS GYAKUTEN-SAIBAN 07/16 Ver 1.0000
USA
2005 CAPCOM DS GYAKUTEN-SAIBAN 07/16 Ver 1.0000
Europe (En,Fr)
2005 CAPCOM DS GYAKUTEN-SAIBAN 12/06 Ver 1.0000
Europe (De,Es,It)
2006 CAPCOM DS GYAKUTEN-SAIBAN 04/18 Ver 1.0000

Regional Differences

Japanese Version Features

  • If the game detects the GBA version of Gyakuten Saiban in the GBA slot while opening the Japanese DS version, the first four cases are unlocked from the beginning. A similar feature exists for the second and the third games in the series. The GBA-slot support was removed from international releases, yet the images for the screens remain.

"The GBA-only game "Gyakuten Saiban" has been detected."
"This game can be set to make all episodes playable from the beginning. Set it?"

  • In the Japanese version of the first three games, there is an English language function available. Selecting it changes the title screen to the US version. While the text boxes have room for two lines while selecting the Japanese option, they are expanded by an extra line when selecting English in order to accommodate the larger script, along with the evidence descriptions.

Language Switch

In every version for the game except the North American one, there's a language switch. The Japanese release has a Japanese / English switch. In one of the European releases there is an English / French switch and in the other European release there is a German / Spanish / Italian switch. When the switch is tapped, the "OBJECTION" graphic appears for the corresponding language, as well as the translated audio. Strangely, only the Japanese version has translated logo graphics (The thing on the top screen of the title screen) as all of the other switches keep it the same. In the Japanese demo, there is no switch.

Japanese / English English / French German / Spanish / Italian North America
Mid-Translation from English to Japanese Mid-Translation from English to French Mid-Translation from German to Spanish No switch :_(

French Version Censorship

Jean Armstrong (Called Kaoru Fond-De-Veau in the JP version) is a flamboyantly gay restaurant chef who gets a brief cameo as a poster in the first game bonus case, and later appears as an important witness in the third game. Capcom USA may have changed the Von Karma nationalities from American to German, but this guy is clearly supposed to be French even in the Japanese version.

Apparently, the French translators didn't like this, so they changed Ema's text upon examining his advertisement in the first game to refer to him as "a Lebanese chef". The translation staff was changed after the second game, and he became an Italian named "Luigi Labocca" in the third game.

Case 1

Japanese International
Ace-Attorney-DS-JP-Passport.png Ace-Attorney-DS-Int-Passport.png

In the first case of the game, one piece of evidence is a passport. In the Japanese version, the passport is red but in the international versions the passport is blue. The text and design was also altered on the international versions. This is because most Japanese passports are colored red while most American passports are colored blue.

Another difference in the first case is when Phoenix explains how the victim didn't bother to change back her clock's time when coming back from her trip, which makes the witness mistake the time. In the Japanese version, the victim took a trip to New York City which makes the witness claim that the time of murder was 2pm. In the international versions, the victim took a trip to Paris which makes the witness claim the time of the murder was 1pm. This difference also extends to when Phoenix tests out the clock in the courtroom. In the Japanese version, the clock claims that it's 9:25am. In the international versions, the clock claims that it's 8:25am.