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Pikmin 2/Early English Script/Louie's Notes

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This is a sub-page of Pikmin 2/Early English Script.

All of Louie's Notes were beefed up significantly in the final version. The localization team clearly had fun when writing these descriptions. Or they were hungry. Possibly both.

Missing entries

The following enemies do not have entries in the early script:

  • Hairy Bulborb
  • Decorated Cannon Beetle
  • Volatile Dweevil
  • Toady Bloyster
  • Segmented Crawbster
  • Waterwraith

Red Bulborb

Early Final
Plump round ones are best
spit-roasted whole. Also make
good steak.
 
 
Plump specimens are best spit
-roasted whole, stuffed with a
lime and a slab of bacon.
Baste frequently to ensure
a magnificently moist haunch.

Orange Bulborb

Early Final
Plump round ones are best
spit-roasted whole. Also make
good steak. When roasted the
skin is most unappeasing to
the eye, and thus is best
removed before hand.
This bulborb's meaty flanks
make for salaciously savory
steaks that shouldn't be missed.
 
 
 

Dwarf Red Bulborb

Early Final
Delicious in soups and stews.
 
 
 
 
 
 
For a blissful bisque,
mince the entire beast finely and
stir in with heavy cream,
artichoke hearts, and a pinch of
black pepper. Heat slowly until
piping hot. Mmmmm... Rich and
creamy!

Snow Bulborb

Early Final
Excellent when boiled and served
with salad.
 
Best grilled and served hot over
a bed of fresh spinach and
crumbled blue cheese.

Dwarf Orange Bulborb

Early Final
When cooked its color is
unpleasant, so it should not
be used as a colorizer.
 
Although difficult to prepare,
this exquisite creature is more
than worth the effort.
Great in fajitas!

This is the first entry that is completely different between versions.

Spotty Bulbear

Early Final
Its skin is quite tough, so remove
it prior to cooking.
 
 
For an unrivaled green curry,
peel away the spotty bulbear's
skin, pulverize the juicy innards,
and stew until curiously fragrant.

Dwarf Bulbear

Early Final
Remove the intestines and other
innards, stuff with fresh herbs
and greens, then broil in oven
until well-cooked.
Remove innards, stuff with sage
and finely aged prosciutto, and
broil until golden brown.
The ultimate crowd pleasers!

Bulborb Larva

Early Final
This creature offers little meat,
but its eyeballs are quite
delictable and can even be eaten raw.
 
This meager creature offers little
meat, but its eyeballs are a local
delicacy. Try them with okra and
a dollop of sour cream!

Fiery Bulblax

Early Final
Delicious deep fried after removing
all the wax. The eyeballs are
particularly delicious.
 

No stove? No problem! This
sizzling beast practically cooks
itself. Remember to thoroughly
extinguish the steaks prior to
eating.

The final description neglects to mention removing the wax. Oops.

Water Dumple

Early Final
Deep-frying without batter
produces a delicate flavor.
When eating raw, choose only
the freshest specimens, and be
wary of parasites.
Deep-fry dumples without
batter for all of the flavor
with half the fat!
 
 

Again, the final version neglects to mention the parasites...

Bulbmin

Early Final
Deep-fry in beer batter. The faint
flavor of savory leaf is quite
exquisite.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Grind the meat and season
with allspice, salt, and ground
white pepper. Press the
seasoned meat into meat
satchels, then panfry them with
onions. Prior to serving,
smother the brats with dijon
mustard and sauerkraut. Buns
are optional.

Food Fact: Allspice is a spice that is an essential part of Caribbean cuisine. It was so named by the English because they thought it combined the flavors of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg.

Fiery Blowhog

Early Final
Can be eaten raw, but is also
quite good boiled with turnips.
 
 
 
Roast this flavorful beast for
several hours, letting it stew
in its own succulent juices.
Don't worry about overcooking
this beast...it's scorch-proof.

Watery Blowhog

Early Final
Tenderize the meat with a rolling
pin and serve raw. Season with
ginger to taste.
This beast's unrivaled moistness
gives it a melt-in-the-mouth
quality that's incomparable.

Armored Cannon Beetle Larva

Early Final
Carefully remove all sand, peel
back exoskelton and slurp heartily.
Also tasty fried.
Carefully remove every grain of
sand, peel back the exoskeleton,
and slurp heartily!

Almost identical but for the extra tip that it's good fried in the early script.

Puffy Blowhog

Early Final
Deep fry the skin until crispy
and serve salted with dip.
 
 
 
 
Slice this creature's feather-
light skin into triangles, deep-fry
until crispy, and salt generously.
Makes the perfect scooping chip
to accompany fresh mango
salsa!

Withering Blowhog

Early Final
Sun-dry, then broil for great
afternoon snack.
 
 
 
 
Hang this creature on a rack and
sun-dry on a hot afternoon.
When suitably crisp, grind the
sun-dried beast into powder.
Makes a great substitute for
cayenne or curry powder!

Gatling Groink

Early Final
Best sauteed together with pellet
posy sprouts.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Remove the cannon and ammo
stockpile, then vigorously
tenderize the meat with a heavy
mallet. Stir-fry with caramelized
onions and figwort sprouts.
Spoon over a steaming bowl of
fluffy white rice and douse with
chili sauce.

Iridescent Flint Beetle

Early Final
Bake in foil, but eat only the
tender pellet inside basted
naturally with the intestinal
fluids.
An essential flavor-accentuating
ingredient in gumbo and
jambalaya. Also delicious in
soups, broths, and marinades.

Food Fact: Jambalaya is a Creole dish made in three parts. It consists of meat, vegetables, and rice.

Iridescent Glint Beetle

Early Final
These are quite scarce and highly
praised, thus they sell at a high
price, so...
 
 
 
 
 
 
This precious treat is
exceptionally rare. I could sell
it back at home for a fortune!
Then, I could use the cash to
upgrade my kitchen, buy
galactic-class ingredients,
and even star in my own
cooking show...
The Insect Gourmet!

Louie's megalomania isn't present in the early script.

Doodlebug

Early Final
Boil the scentless legs with just
pinch of salt until tender, then
separate the meat and serve with
butter, salt and pepper to taste.
 
Looking for a flavor that will
surprise and delight your
guests? This beast's aroma may
surprise your guests, but it
won't be delightful!

Note that Louie doesn't impart any cooking instructions in the final game.

Female Sheargrub

Early Final
Sautee lightly. Its flesh has its
highest oil content and thus is
particulalry flavorful just prior
to laying its eggs.
 
 
 
 
 
For an unforgettable quiche,
slice this creature up and mix
with four eggs, two vine-ripened
tomatoes, diced zucchini, and
generous handfuls of feta and
swiss. Bake until crusty and
golden. This beast is most
flavorful if caught and cooked
just after laying its eggs.

Male Sheargrub

Early Final
Best sauteed in a frying pan
together with raptor talons.
 
 
 
Spread several specimens in the
bottom of a casserole dish and
layer with sliced avocado. Bake
until the meat is choice and the
cheese is lusciously browned.

Not sure what Louie means by raptor talons. There are no raptors in Pikmin (yet).

Shearwig

Early Final
Wait until molting, then boil the
so-called "soft-shell" portion and
season. It is surprisingly
delicious, except for the wings.
 
 
Grate this beast into a zest and
whisk with sugar, cream, and
chopped dark chocolate for a
lusciously indulgent mousse
that's a true culinary coup de
grace!

Cloaking Burrow-nit

Early Final
Leave the shell on and boil with
a pinch of sauce, then serve hot
with tartar sauce.
Boil in the shell with a pinch of
salt until bright red, and serve
piping hot with tartar sauce.

Another almost identical description, but the final script gives more detailed instructions on when to stop boiling.

Ravenous Whiskerpillar

Early Final
Sautee with butter and white
wine for a truly gourmet meal.
 
Delicious skillet-seared or
sauteed with scallions and
a red Genovese sauce.

Food fact: Genovese sauce consists of beef flank, yellow or white onions, one carrot, olive oil, white wine, tomato concentrate, and prosciutto. It takes 3 to 5 hours to make and is normally served on pasta.

Anode Beetle

Early Final
Gradually drain its electrical
charge, then roast over an open
flame. Eating them when they are
still charged is possible, but
produces a tingling sensation.
 
Drain the electrical charge
before boiling. Although it is
possible to eat an anode beetle
while it is charged, doing so may
result in an unpleasant tingling
sensation.

Mitite

Early Final
Flash-fry in a frying pan, then
sprinkle grated cheese on top.
Remove the legs in advance for
those who find them unappealing.
Flash-fry with garlic and red
chilis in a hot pan, then sprinkle
with grated gorgonzola.
Some dinner guests may find the
legs unappealing, so it's best to
remove them before serving.

Hermit Crawmad

Early Final
The smaller ones are quite good
dipped in beer-batter and deep
fried.
 
Shuck from the shell, bake on
high heat until crispy, then dip in
a pot of melted milk chocolate.
Lip-smacking sweet!

Swooping Snitchbug

Early Final
Poke a hole in the belly of a
fresh one and suck out its
contents. It is robustly
nourishing.
Remove the wings, marinate a
well-marbled steak for several
hours in a chipotle marinade,
then charbroil to perfection.

Bumbling Snitchbug

Early Final
After removing the wings, fry it.
It goes splendidly with lemon
juice.
 
 
Remove the wings and discard
the remainder of the beast.
Enjoy the luxurious, wafer-thin
wings with fine water-dumple
caviar.

Careening Dirigibug

Early Final
Blend it up shell and all in a
blender and form into meatballs.
Use in stews and sauces.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pull off the balloonlike air sacs,
mince the meaty abdomen, and
shape it into small cakes. Pan-
sear the cakes until crusted, but
be careful not to overcook the
delicate meat. When ready to
serve, garnish the plate with
the vibrant air sacs. Even the
most discerning dinner guest will
be dazzled by the colorful
presentation!

Antenna Beetle

Early Final
Boil until the shell peels off, then
fry.
 
 
 
Extract meat from the
exoskeleton and sear on all sides
in a hot wok to seal in the
flavor. Top the dish off with a
splash of spicy peanut sauce.

Lesser Spotted Jellyfloat

Early Final
Sun dry, then eat with salad or
other fresh greens.
 
 
 
 
 
Similar in taste and texture to
gelatin, this jiggling mass of
jelly can be sculptured into all
kinds of creative shapes. As a
bonus, it also doubles as
professional-grade hair gel. It's
the perfect cool summer treat!

Greater Spotted Jellyfloat

Early Final
The odor can be off-putting, so
wash it thoroughly with water,
then dry in the sun.
 
 
 
Like a fine cheese, the aroma of
this fluid floater can be
oppressive, but its flavor must
be experienced to be believed.
Also makes an unforgettable
nondairy spread!

Fiery Dweevil

Early Final
If left too long, this will
spontaneously combust, so
prepare and eat soon after
hunting.
 
 
 
The search for a gourmet, high-
protein salad-topping alternative
to bacon bits is over! Grind this
spicy dweevil into tasty micro-
chunks and toss them generously
over your salad to add instant
flair AND flavor!

The Fiery Dweevil keeps a lot better in the final script.

Anode Dweevil

Early Final
Fry until crispy, sprinkle with
lemon juice, then serve.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Raw anode dweevil makes for
an unforgettable sushi treat,
but if it is not prepared by an
expert hand with exacting
precision, consumption could
result in a jolting electrical
explosion of apocalyptic
proportion.

Caustic Dweevil

Early Final
Due to its high water content,
this has a much more subtle
flavor than other varieties, so it
is best served with ample salt.
Inedible. Effects of consumption
include uncontrollable arm
flailing and enthusiastic
dishwashing.

The Caustic Dweevil went from being edible to inedible. This will happen a bit more in later entries.

Munge Dweevil

Early Final
Regardless of temperature, heat
does not seem to rid this of its
gaseous deposits, so it is best
not to eat this.
 
 
Exposure to even extreme heat
doesn't seem to rid this creature
of deposits of potent gas.
It's probably best for everyone
if you avoid eating this
hazardous fare.

Yellow Wollywog

Early Final
Apart from the legs, this
creature is too watery and
gelatinous, and is not suited for
cooking. It is fine to cook the
legs and dispose of the rest.
Beer-batter and deep-fry for a
down-home flavor you won't
soon forget!


Only the frog's legs are edible in the early script.

Wollywog

Early Final
This is best ground up into a
patty and fired on a grill over
an open flame.
 
 
 
 
 
Wollywogs are best ground up,
shaped into a patty, and flame-
broiled on a grill. Slap on
tomato slices, lettuce, onions,
ketchup, and slide the patty
between a sesame-seed bun for
the ultimate beast-burger
experience.

Wogpole

Early Final
Cover with bread crumbs and
deep fry.




Wogpoles can be eaten raw, but
they're much more flavorful when
steamed or grilled. Also
heavenly in risotto! Feel free to
experiment with this lush
ingredient.

Lapis Lazuli Candypop Bud

Early Final
This plant smells far too weedy,
and is unfortunately not suited
for salads.
 
This flower's tough texture
makes it unsuitable for salads,
but its bright blue hue makes for
a grandiose garnish!

Crimson Candypop Bud

Early Final
This spicy flower does not go
well with salads.
 
 
This spicy flower combusts upon
contact with the tongue. Keep
fire-retardant condiments within
arm's reach!

The intensity of this flower increased in the final script.

Golden Candypop Bud

Early Final
This is far too acidic for use in
cooking.
 
This tart flower's acidic juices
can burn a hole through a frying
pan. Eating it would be unwise.

Violet Candypop Bud

Early Final
With oil so dense it is called the
butter of the woods, eating this
plant leaves the tummy feeling
thick with grease, and thus is
not recommended for salads.
This convenient purple flower
secretes a dark, flavorful oil that
eliminates the need for salad
dressing!
 

The palatibility of the bud's oil improved in the final script.

Ivory Candypop Bud

Early Final
This flower does not keep well,
spoiling very quickly, making it
insuitable for cooking.
This elusive flower spoils
within seconds of picking,
making it unsuitable for cooking.

Queen Candypop Bud

Early Final
Eating this plant raw leads to a
loosening of the bowels, so it
is not recommended for cooking.
Eating this flower leads to
spectacular, breathtaking
indigestion.

The description of the side effects were toned down a bit.

Creeping Chrysanthemum

Early Final
Toss the flowers and stem, slice
the bulb and serve fresh with
salad.
 
When thinly sliced, this
predator's sizeable bulb
makes a sumptuous pizza
topping.

Skitter Leaf

Early Final
Generally used only as a garnish,
this leaf has a decidedly pleasant
woodsy flavor when steamed delicately.
 
The superb amalgamation of juicy
meat and leafy greens ensures
that the skitter leaf will be the
new spinach!

Unmarked Spectralids

Early Final
There is little meat on these, but
the wings are surprisingly tasty,
partlicularly with a sweet glaze.
 
 
 
Spectralids don't provide a lot of
meat, but the exquisitely elegant
wings are surprisingly tasty,
particularly when expertly
prepared with a sweet candied
glaze.

The "partlicularly" misspelling was corrected in the final game.

Honeywisp

Early Final
Suck the eggs through a straw
for a very balanced, if slightly
unappealing, meal.
 
 
 
 
Although the eggs are small,
the yolk has a distinctly bold
and tangy flavor. Try tossing a
few in a pan along with your
choice of meat and fresh
vegetables and cook up a
country scramble!

Mamuta

Early Final
Rots almost immediately, so if
one is caught it should be boiled
on the spot. Keeps up to three days.
Inedible. Tastes like chicken.
 
 

Mamuta was changed to be inedible in the final game.

Breadbug

Early Final
This is hard and difficult to season.
For the trouble required, it is not
particularly tasty. However, it is
most nutricious, and thus holds
promise for future experimentation
in the kitchen.
Breadbugs are hearty and
nutritious but also bland and
unimaginative. They may be
palatable in a pinch, but they
hold no true culinary promise.
 

Louie's opinion on the culinary possibilities of the breadbug flipped between versions.

Pellet Posy

Early Final
The flavor of this mellows
signficantly when added to
soup.
 
 
On a quest for the perfect
hors d'oeuvre? Slow cook this
plant in a wood-fire oven,
but be careful to only serve
the tender pellet.

Common Glowcap

Early Final
Remarkably delicious fresh,
boiled, broiled or sauteed, this
fungus will likely experience a
sharp rise in popularity.
Rapturous fresh or sauteed,
this illuminating fungus will be
hot in the galaxy's trendiest
restaurants.

Glowstem

Early Final
Inedible.
 
 
Inedible. Known effects include
uncontrollable episodes
of impromptu break dancing.

Clover

Early Final
Inedible.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mildly poisonous. May result in
nausea, headache, fever, fatigue,
chest pains, paralysis, loss of
bone density, moodiness,
feral rage, sauciness, dilly-
dallying, strokes of brilliance,
and untimely doom.

This is the first instance of the bland "Inedible." message being punched up significantly.

Figwort

Early Final
Inedible.
 
 
 
 
This titillating ingredient tastes
impossibly fresh, but you must
cook it immediately after
picking. If you don't, it'll go bad
within minutes!

Figwort was made edible in the final script.

Dandelion

Early Final
Use young leaves only in salads
or as seasoning. Use the flower
as a garnish.
Young leaves are only suitable
in garden salads. Use the flower
to add color to your dishes.

Seeded Dandelion

Early Final
Dried, roasted and ground up, the
roots of this plant make a suitable
coffee substitute.
Dried, roasted, and finely ground,
the root of this plant makes a
passable coffee substitute.

Horsetail

Early Final
Remove and discard primitive,
scale-like leaves then boil.
 
 
Remove and discard the
primitive, scaly leaves, then
blanch the tender stock in a
buttery broth.

Foxtail

Early Final
Inedible.
  
 
Inedible. Plagues victims with
potent, debilitating cramps.
 

Margaret

Early Final
Inedible.
 
 
 
Can be eaten fresh out of the
soil, but it's much more flavorful
when incorporated into a
heavenly veggie lasagna.

More re-edibilitifizing. Or whatever the word for that is.

Fiddlehead

Early Final
Peel off the unopened leaves and
boil in a rich broth.
 
 
 
 
Sun-dry the leaves for several
days, then grind them with a
mortar and pestle. The resulting
herb grants an aromatic, earthy
flavor to mutton and poultry
dishes.

Shoot

Early Final
Inedible.

Inedible. And yet strangely
delicious.

Empress Bulblax

Early Final
The ovaries, flavored with just a
hint of salt, are an incredible
delicacy. Everyone should
appreciate this flavor at least
once.
For a sophisticated delicacy,
make a pate de foie gras from
this massively obese creature's
liver and spread it over a sesame
cracker.

The edible portion was changed from the ovaries to the liver. It's not hard to guess why!

Burrowing Snagret

Early Final
Baste with a savory sauce and
cook on a skewer over an open
flame.
 
 
Slice the serpentine torso into
thin medallions, skewer on a
metal rod with Hocotate onions,
and barbecue over an open
flame.

Beady Long Legs

Early Final
Danger! Do not eat!
 
 
Poisonous. Consumption results
in prolonged writhing and
uncontrollable mirth.

Emperor Bulblax

Early Final
Using the tongue as a stew base
is most exquisite.
 
 
 
 
 
 
To prep the tongue for cooking,
marinate in olive oil and
chop into cubes. Stir in a pot
with carrots, potatoes, and
chives, cover, and simmer over
low heat for several hours.
Accompany this mouthwatering,
rustic stew with a hearty roll.

Giant Breadbug

Early Final
More meat than a common bread
bug, but even less flavor...
 
 
 
Although cooking this colossal
beast yields a mountain of meat,
every ounce of it is flavorless.
Only suitable for intergalactic
all-you-can-eat buffets.

Pileated Snagret

Early Final
Bathe this fine meat bathe in a
basting of its own juices while
roasting slowly. Separate the
juices, thicken them into a gravy,
then pour over and serve with
stuffing.
 
 
 
You haven't lived until you've
tasted a mint-braised snagret
shank! Or if you're feeling
especially saucy, stuff a bird
with a can of your favorite
savory nectar, throw it on the
barbeque, and let the juices
mingle to make a mean
beverage-canister snagret!

Man-at-Legs

Early Final
This is pretty much just
machinery... The oil isn't too bad,
though.
 
Although the meat is a bit on the
metallic side, the oil makes a
mouthwatering gravy or
lubricative vinaigrette.

Food Fact: Machines are not food.

Ranging Bloyster

Early Final
The gills are best preprared
deep fried in beer batter. It
is also tasty served in a
peanut sauce.
 
The gills are best prepared
deep-fried in an herb and bread-
crumb batter. Also tasty
poached and drenched with fine
soy sauce.

Raging Long Legs

Early Final
Neither boiling nor baking seems
to dimish the musty scent of this
thing. It should not have been eaten...
 
 
Neither boiling nor baking can
diminish this creature's
overpowering musky scent.
Only suitable for serving to
unpleasant in-laws.

Titan Dweevil

Early Final
Raw or cooked, the legs of this
are quite tasty. Season to taste.
 
 
Eaten raw, this predator's
luxurious legs are bold and full
flavored. What a satisfying
crunch!