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Frogger (NES, JungleTac)

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Title Screen

Frogger

Developer: JungleTac
Publisher: Majesco
Platforms: Unlicensed NES, VT03, VT09, Plug & Play


DebugIcon.png This game has debugging material.
Carts.png This game has revisional differences.


A licensed port of Frogger on not-so-licensed Famiclone hardware. It is not backwards-compatible with an original NES/Famicom; however, it was exclusively released on plug & plays and proprietary handheld devices.

Controller and RAM Test

Jungletac-frogger-test.png

Accessed by holding A + B as the game enters the main Frogger title screen. The screen pictured appears glitched at the top, likely due to it being hacked up and re-released so many times...

Revisional Differences

This version of Frogger has been republished several times, with some revisions having differences from each other. Here are the known alternate versions of the game:

  • VT03 version 1 - Featured in the original Frogger TV Arcade by Majesco. The A and B buttons can make Frogger jump forward. There are several copyright screens at the beginning before reaching the title screen.
  • VT03 version 2 - Included in Konami Collector's Series - Arcade Advanced, also released by Majesco. Identical to their other release save for cutting out the copyright screens (though they are still present in the coding).
  • VT09 version 1 - Included in the NJ Pocket series of handhelds. Only the B button can make Frogger jump forward; the A button no longer works. No copyright screens.
  • VT09 version 2 - The version found in the MSI Entertainment Frogger system. Both A and B buttons function. One copyright screen.
  • Unknown hardware version - Mini arcade machine released as part of Basic Fun's "Arcade Classics" line. It features an entirely different soundtrack; this was seemingly done using some sort of extra, non-NES device, evident by the music saving its place when the volume is turned off/on. One copyright screen.