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Scooby-Doo! Who's Watching Who? (PlayStation Portable)

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Title Screen

Scooby-Doo! Who's Watching Who?

Developer: Savage Entertainment
Publisher: THQ
Platform: PlayStation Portable
Released in US: October 16, 2006
Released in EU: November 17, 2006
Released in AU: November 23, 2006


DevTextIcon.png This game has hidden development-related text.


Who's Watching Who is Yet Another Scooby-Doo game that doesn't quite hit the mark.

Hmmm...
To do:
Leftover script files from He-Man: Defender of Grayskull.

Developer Notes

strb_en.asc

# All string entries are made up of a descriptor and the string itself.
# The descriptor is used to identify the string, so (as an example)
# when an object is picked up, its display message entry refers to the
# descriptor (e.g. "pickup").  The text that gets displayed is the string
# associated with that descriptor.
# Furthermore, it is possible to compound strings.  If one string is
# to be displayed within another string, the place where that string
# is to be inserted is marked by %s.
#	Example for pickup object message:
#		string = "like"		"I like %s a lot."
#		string = "person"	"Rubbing Myself"	
#
#		pickup_message = "like" "person"
#
#		Results in "I like Rubbing Myself a lot."
#
# NOTE:	It is important when constructing compound strings
#		that the number of descriptors matches the %s count.
#		This becomes especially relevant with nested compound
#		strings (i.e. a string that contains a %s, which is filled
#		by another string that contains a %s, etc.)
#		
#		Descriptor length limit is currently 16 characters.


# Scooby Doo
# IMPORTANT: Do NOT change the tabs in this file; there needs to be exactly one tab 
#            between the two columns in order to export cleanly to the localization
#            spreadsheet.
#

This text is present at the top of each main text file for each language. The example used for compound strings is... fairly questionable.


hudpltfm.asc

# ---------------------------------------------------------------
#
# SCOOBY HEALTH HUD ITEMS
# 
# ---------------------------------------------------------------

# Some magic numbers to get the health bar working:
#
# POSITION: X = 16, Y = 33 
# -- This is the number of pixels into the background that the
#    meter needs to be placed.  Because the size is scaled by
#    this offset needs to also be scaled by 2.  For example, the
#    x position of the health bar is determined by: (3.0 + 16 * 2 = 35.0)
# SIZE: X = 24, Y = 56
# -- This is the width in pixels of the relevant portion of the
#    health meter texture.  Again, it's doubled because the
#    background was doubled.

charzobj.asc

# Ice File - exported from 3D Studio MAX R3
# Exporter written by Michael Starich of Swingin' Ape Studios
# Max filename = Character_Zoo07.max

wpcafpar.asc

######skippy was here########
######so did wan  ########


fxslpart.asc

#############################################
## ---------------->BAS Was here<----------------##
#############################################


#############################################
## ---------------->PETE'S WORKSHOP<----------------##
#############################################

fxxplode.asc

###########################################################
## --------------->JACK'S HANDY WORK<-------------------##
############################################################


(Source: Original TCRF research)