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Bubble Bobble (NES)

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Title Screen

Bubble Bobble

Developer: Taito
Publishers: Taito (JP/US/EU), Mattel (AU)
Platforms: NES, Famicom Disk System
Released in JP: October 30, 1987 (FDS)
Released in US: November 1988
Released in EU: October 26, 1990
Released in AU: 1990


MusicIcon.png This game has unused music.
RegionIcon.png This game has regional differences.


They may have lost the original arcade source code somewhere along the way, but that certainly never stopped Taito from trying to port Bubble Bobble to anything with a CPU.

Unused Music

Track 35 on the NSF (34 in the sound test) is an interesting folk dance-like tune, normally accessible through the sound test. This tune is not in the arcade version, so it was probably included as a bonus for those who managed to unlock the sound test.

Interestingly, this track was used in the American/Japanese version of Rainbow Islands as the staff roll theme!

(Source: Original TCRF research)

Regional Differences

Hmmm...
To do:
There are still a few more differences.

Title Screen

FDS NES
BubbleBobbleTitleScreenFDS.png Bubble Bobble-title.png

The NES version has a new Taito logo. The FDS version is identical to the one seen in the original arcade version. The Bubble Bobble logo was also moved to make more room for the new "licensed by Nintendo of America Inc." text.

Intro Text

FDS NES
Bubble Bobble-Intro JP.png Bubble Bobble-Intro US.png

The intro text was given a clean up for the NES version. For some reason, the exclamation mark was made taller.

Color Palette

FDS NES
BubbleBobble-RedTint.png BubbleBobble-NoRedTint.png

For some reason, the FDS version leaves the PPU's red emphasis bit on at all times, giving the entire game a red tint. The NES version leaves all emphasis bits turned off.

(Source: Original TCRF research)