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User:Vyroz

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Vyroz
Birthdate: 2004
Birthplace: Mexico

Discord: Vyroz#6365
Twitter: _Vyroz_
Also known in other places as: Vee

Hi! I like Kirby :). My main language is Spanish, but I'm fluent in english. I use He/They pronouns.

If you need to contact me, my Discord tag is Vyroz#6365, and my Twitter is @_Vyroz_

Babel user information
en-4 This user has near native speaker knowledge of English.
es-N Este usuario tiene una comprensión nativa del español.
pt-2 Este utilizador tem um nível médio de português.
Users by language

Pages I created

Pages I like to edit

Wanna know what I use to rip Kirby games?

Good! Here are a list of programs you'll be needing.

GBA Kirby Games

Program Function
Tile Molester Used to view and edit every single sprite in the games.
GBA Mus Riper Rips every song and sound effect in the game as a .MID file, along with its soundfont. This allows for very high quality music rips. Only works with the Sappy Sound Engine.
HxD I just know I can find some text and ability attack names, I don't know what else I could use it for lmao.

Kirby Air Ride

While I haven't done anything with this game's page yet, I have tried to dig it with the following programs.

Program Function Compatible File Formats
DAT Texture Wizard Used to extract the textures from a HAL .DAT file. HAL .DAT
HSDRAW Used to extract the Models and Animations of the game, as well as sound effects. HAL .DAT, .SSM
VGAudio Used to convert Air Ride's music files into another format. I convert them into .BRSTM, though you could probably find another program that can directly convert these into .WAV or something. .HPS
BrawlCrate Used to convert the .BRSTMs into .WAV .BRSTM

Modern Kirby Games

While the modern Kirby games may be all similar regarding internals, the programs required to open some stuff are completely different when it comes to consoles.

Program Function Games Compatible File Formats
BrawlCrate Can be used as a model viewer and editor, can play and record animations, can view & export textures and "lyt" sprites, can rip music and certain SFX from sound archives. It can basically do almost everything for the Wii Kirby games. Kirby's Return to Dream Land, Kirby's Dream Collection Special Edition .BRRES, .BRRES.CMP, .ARC, .ARC.CMP, .BRLYT, .BRSAR, .BRSTM, .BRWAR, .BREFF, .BREFF.CMP, .TPL
BRSAR Extractor Used to extract everything in a .BRSAR. BrawlBox/BrawlCrate won't open/play the Wii games' Wave Archives directly through the .BRSAR for some reason, but will open them if they're exctracted with this tool. Kirby's Return to Dream Land, Kirby's Dream Collection Special Edition .BRSAR
PuyoTools Used to decompress the files of the 3DS Kirby games that end in ".CMP". Essential if you want to look at literally (almost) everything inside the games. (Also used to decompress Kirby's Return to Dream Land's mint archive. Probably works with Dream Collection too.) Every Kirby 3DS game + Kirby's Return to Dream Land and Kirby's Dream Collection Special Edition (mint only). Files that end in .CMP
SPICA Can be used as a model viewer, can play animations, can view and export textures. Every 3DS Kirby game. .BCH, decompressed BCH.CMP
Ohana3DS Can be used as a model viewer apparently, but it doesn't work for me. I mainly use it to view and export "lyt" sprites. Every 3DS Kirby game. Compressed "lyt" .BCH.CMP, .BCLIM
BCTSM to WAV Converter Used to convert .BCSTM files into WAV. Every 3DS Kirby game. .BCSTM
Kuriimu Used to view and edit text entries. Literally every modern Kirby game. .MSBT
Kukkii Comes with Kuriimu. Used to view & extract fonts, textures and lyt sprites. Every 3DS Kirby game. BCFNT, decompressed .BCFNT.CMP, .BCH, decompressed .BCH.CMP, .ARC, decompressed .ARC.CMP, .BCLYT, .BCLIM, .BFLIM
Karameru Comes with Kuriimu. Used to browse the File System of a game. Every 3DS Kirby game. Many
Kuriimu2 I only use it to patch something into the game for demonstration purposes (such as KTDX's Demo mapdata), but it can do what Kuriimu, Kukkii and Karameru can. Every 3DS Kirby game Many
Mint Workshop Used to dig through the contents of Mint archives. Literally every modern Kirby game. Mint .BIN, decompressed Mint .BIN.CMP
Noesis I only use it to export textures I extracted from the 3DS games as .BMP to export them again as .PNG. This is because the act of converting them to .BMP reveals details hidden by the alpha channel of the texture. Theoretically every modern Kirby game, but main use is for the 3DS games. Idk every image file type?
MobiclipDecoder Used to view and export the movie files of the games. Kirby's Return to Dream Land, Kirby: Triple Deluxe, Kirby: Planet Robobot, Kirby Battle Royale .MO, .MOFLEX
Citric Comopser (the compiled version) Used to browse through sound archives and other stuff. Every 3DS Kirby game. .BCSAR, .BCSTM, .BCSWSD, .BCWAR
KirbyFDGH Used to browse through the FDG archives. Literally every modern Kirby game. .DAT
RDLParamGUI Used to modify and look around the param files of the games. Kirby's Return to Dream Land, Kirby's Dream Collection: Special Edition, Kirby: Triple Deluxe, Kirby Fighters Deluxe, Dedede's Drum Dash Deluxe, Kirby: Planet Robobot .BIN, decompressed .BIN.CMP
KirbyYAML used to browse the yaml files of Robobot. Kirby: Planet Robobot (i haven't tried it on other games, but may work on the ones after robobot) .BIN, decompressed .BIN.CMP
HxD I only ever used it to save-edit Kirby Battle Royale to gain the amiibo hats and to check the true file format of a file. Change the value of 0x3FC, 0x40C, 0x4CC, 0x4DC, and 0x4EC to 0x04 (thanks to reserved) for KBR's savedata. Theoretically every modern Kirby game. Everything I guess. Save-data is a .DAT file.

Epic Yarn Games

Kirby's Epic Yarn and Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn have very similar structures, though the programs used to rip stuff do differ between games. These games don't use Mint coding.

Program Function Games Compatible File Formats
QuickBMS Used in conjunction with a Kirby's Epic Yarn BMS Script, this tool is used to extract everything in a .GFA file. You MUST use this if you want to rip everything (except music). Thanks to Larsenv for telling me about this! Both. .GFA
BrawlCrate Can be used as a model viewer and editor, though file editing may take place in order to view models properly. Can play and record animations, can view & export textures and "env" sprites, can rip music. It can do the essentials. Kirby's Epic Yarn .BRRES, .ARC, .BRSAR, .BRSTM, .BRWAR, .BREFF, .BRTEX, .TPL
BRSAR Extractor Used to extract everything in a .BRSAR. BrawlBox/BrawlCrate won't open/play the Wave Archives directly through the .BRSAR , just like with Return to Dream Land and Dream Collection. It will open them if they're exctracted with this tool. Kirby's Epic Yarn .BRSAR
SPICA Can be used as a model viewer, though file editing may take place in order to view models properly. Can play animations, can view and export textures. Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn. .BCH
BCTSM to WAV Converter Used to convert .BCSTM files into WAV. Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn. .BCSTM
Kuriimu Used to view and edit text entries. Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn .MSBT
Karameru Comes with Kuriimu. Used to browse the File System of a game. Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn Many
Kukkii Comes with Kuriimu. Used to view & extract fonts, textures and env sprites. Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn .BCFNT, "env" .BCH
Citric Comopser (the compiled version) Used to browse through KEEY's sound archive. Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn .BCSAR, .BCSTM, .BCSWSD, .BCWAR
HxD I only use it to dig around Epic Yarn's msg files. They're sadly not .MSBT. Both I guess??? Everything, I guess. KEY's msg files are .BIN.

My contribs

Special:Contributions/Vyroz

Robobot Prerelease

i'm at it again

This page details prerelease information and/or media for Kirby: Planet Robobot.

Development Timeline

  • 2014
    • ?? - The game starts its development alongside Kirby Fighters Deluxe and Dedede's Drum Dash Deluxe[1]. The game was completed under 2 years.
  • 2016
    • Mar. 3rd - The game is revealed in a Nintendo Direct event.
    • Apr. 28th - The game is released in Japan.
    • Jun, 10th - The game is released in the United States, Europe, and Korea.
    • Jun. 11th - The game is released in Australia.

References

Miiverse Posts

Like with Kirby: Triple Deluxe, a "Behind the Scenes" community was created for the game. Unlike the game before it, however, it didn't include developer posts; Instead, the community hosted three "Kirby: Planet Robobot Ask-a-thon" events, where the players could ask director Shinya Kumazaki various things about the game. The replies below were archived by the people behind "Kirby behind-the-scenes archive".

Ask-a-thon 1

The first Ask-a-thon, with lots of development info.

August 9th 2016 10:56 AM Reply

A reply to the question "How did you decide upon ‘Kirby: Planet Robobot’ for the game title?". Here, Kumazaki explains how the team came up with the game's title.

Initially, we’d planned to call it “Kirby: HAGANE” (“hagane” is Japanese for “steel”), but as Popstar would be populated by robots, we then leaned towards “Kirby: Robot Planet”. As titles go, this was far too literal and lacked impact, so we changed it again to “Roborobo Planet”. One last tweak and the result was “Planet Robobot”, which is in keeping with the playfulness of the Kirby universe. The name for the “Robobot Armor” also came up around this time.

August 9th 2016 11:03 AM Reply

A reply to the question "What was it that inspired you to create this game, and how long did it take to produce it?". This time, Kumazaki explain the development process of the game.

Since we ended up developing two Kirby games in a row using the same hardware - the first being Kirby: Triple Deluxe - this time, we wanted to do a completely different take on the world. At the same time, we were also hoping to attract a new audience. We thought a mechanized world would do well, since then it would be the polar opposite to the previous game’s warm skies and lush scenery. The concept for the Robobot Armor was then proposed as a means of performing new copy abilities unique to the mechanized world. Regarding the length of development, we worked on Planet Robobot in parallel with other titles such as Dedede’s Drum Dash Deluxe, and it was completed in under two years.

August 9th 2016 11:14 AM Reply

Answers to the questions "Was there a specific part of the creation process that you found especially challenging? And if you had the chance to redesign the whole game, would you want to improve any specific areas of it?". Kumazaki explains more about the game's development.

We were instructed by our producer to avoid any situation that might remind players of Triple Deluxe and I think that although this was a great idea, it was a nightmare to put into practice. We had limited development time and still had to make use of the assets from the previous game. Because we were using Triple Deluxe’s engine, a lot of the gameplay felt similar, so I was constantly fighting to preserve the Kirby series’ distinctive feel and yet produce something fresh and new. There were, of course, many things that I would have liked to refine or improve, but rather than regret not being able to address them, I try to use those shortcomings as motivation to look to the future and help myself do a better job next time. It’s a continuous process that never really ends.

August 9th 2016 11:24 AM Reply

Here, the director gives out answers to the questions "Is Susie Haltmann’s real daughter?" and "Is Susie a clone or a robot?". He also informs about scrapped ideas for the game's story, documented below.

I initially considered making it so that Haltmann, in his loneliness, created a robotic Susie who believed she was alive, but that idea was discarded to avoid overcomplicating the story. At the time, I also considered a scenario with one final twist, where you discover that Haltmann was actually a robot all along.

Ask-a-thon 3

The third Ask-a-thon.

September 7th 2016 1:53 PM Reply

Reply to the question "How did you decide which abilities would make it into the game?". Here, Kumazaki explains the struggles of implementing Copy Abilities.

In the past 5 or 6 years, we’ve gained over 10 new abilities so we’re always struggling to balance out the old and new ones. We were also restricted by development time and hardware limitations. But even from the perspective of game balance, once you go over 25 copy abilities, you start to see an effect on the frequency of each ability per stage and on the balancing for the new Robobot elements. Even with the limited number of abilities that made the cut, the command inputs make up for it with a wide variety of actions so it isn’t such a problem.

September 7th 2016 2:16 PM Reply

Kumazaki provides info about the Meta Knight's eye color: "In the moment that Mecha Knight+’s mask cracks, the player gets a glimpse of Meta Knight’s eyes, which appear to be yellow. Were they always this way?"

That’s quite a thing to spot. In Kirby’s Adventure on the Famicom (NES), Meta Knight’s eyes are indeed white. At that time, there was a limit to the number of colors you could use, so I think that white was chosen because it stood out more. 
They were also white in Kirby Super Star (EU: Kirby’s Fun Pak), but when we created the 3D model for this game, giving him white eyes somehow didn’t feel right. And besides, his eyes have always shone with a yellow glow from behind his mask. We were worried about how old-school fans might react to this, but for the purposes of the design, we settled on yellow eyes.

September 7th 2016 2:20 PM Reply

Here, Kumazaki gives out answers to 3 questions:

  • No. 1: Did you increase the overall difficulty level for this game?
  • No. 2: There seem to be a lot more cinematic effects this time. Was this deliberate?
  • No. 3: The opening movie sequence was a lot shorter this time round. Why is that?
All right, I’ll explain. Regarding the difficulty, I think that you should still be able to complete the main game with relative ease (easy enough for a developer’s 4-year-old daughter to defeat the bosses in levels 1-3). But for the modes that are unlocked after completing Story Mode, we cranked the difficulty right up and challenged players to try and give it their best shot. Next, we used movie-like camera angles to reinforce the sci-fi theme. And during boss fights, we utilized pauses and moments of foreboding to give players with less experience in the action genre more time to orient themselves. And as for the opening movie, the reason why it’s so short is because last time we depicted key items and daily life in great detail. We decided to forego that this time because players are already familiar with those kinds of stage-setting scenes from the rest of the series. We instead chose to leap straight into the moment of the disaster.