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Resident Evil (PlayStation)

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Title Screen

Resident Evil

Also known as: Bio Hazard (JP)
Developer: Capcom
Publishers: Capcom (JP/US), Virgin Interactive (EU)
Platform: PlayStation
Released in JP: March 22, 1996
Released in US: March 30, 1996
Released in EU: August 1, 1996


DevTextIcon.png This game has hidden development-related text.
RegionIcon.png This game has regional differences.
Carts.png This game has revisional differences.


ProtoIcon.png This game has a prototype article
PrereleaseIcon.png This game has a prerelease article

So very stubbly.
This page is rather stubbly and could use some expansion.
Are you a bad enough dude to rescue this article?
Hmmm...
To do:
A whole lot of text, and not a lot of media.
Hmmm...
To do:
More difference between prototypes and final release. source

Ahh, Resident Evil. The game that spawned several sequels, a remake and numerous other media, including a load of less than desirable movies. The game has some amazing graphics for the time, but it relies heavily on fixed camera angles that made up for some fairly pretty pre-rendered backgrounds. Also inventory management. A fair bit of it.

Unused Items

DumDum Rounds

RE1dumdumrounds.png

Alternate bullets for the Colt Python magnum. Though the game describes them as more powerful, they actually do less damage than the standard .357 magnum rounds. They can only be used in the original game through hacking and were removed entirely for the Director's Cut version.

Flamethrower Fuel

RE1fuel.png

Much like in the sequel, fuel for the flamethrower is hidden in the game's coding but goes unused.

Pickaxe

RE1pickaxe.png

Removed from the final game for unknown reasons. Interestingly, when attempting to use this item a prompt will appear onscreen giving you the choice of yes/no instead of the default "this item cannot be used" message though nothing seems to happen with either choice. Has a black inventory graphic but a full 3D model when examined.

Oil

RE1oil.png

An orange can of oil with a flame graphic on the front. Its intended use is unknown.

Comm Radio

RE1radio.png

This item is given to the player in storyline but never used in-game outside of cutscenes. Features a glitchy inventory graphic.

Build Date

Japan 1.0 USA Japan 1.1 PAL (English) PAL (French) PAL (German)
01/01 01 MASTER 21:00 19960222 BIO HAZARD 01/01 01 MASTER 09:00 19960308 RESIDENT EVIL 01/01 02 MASTER 14:00 19960309 BIO HAZARD 01/01 01 MASTER 09:00 19960614 RESIDENT EVIL 01/01 01 MASTER 10:00 19960621 RESIDENT EVIL 01/01 01 MASTER 09:00 19960712 RESIDENT EVIL

These are the build dates for different completion builds of the original 1996 release found in the CAPCOM.INF file. They can also be seen by inserting the game disc in any disc drive on your computer, and simply seeing the "last modified" date on the SLPS_002.22 file or such equivalent.

Regional Differences

Original 1996 Version

Title Screen

Japan USA
Biohazard-Title.png ResEvil - Title.png

The Resident Evil series is known as Biohazard in Japan, although the title in this first entry was spelled as two words.

Font

Japan USA
Biohazard-Font.png Resident Evil-Font.png

Bio Hazard contains a few lines of English text. When the game was localized, it was given a new variable-width font. However, they didn't take advantage of this for the lines of text that was originally in English as those retained their original formatting.

File Images

Botany Book Keeper's Diary Researcher's Will & Letter
Biohazard-Botany Book.png Biohazard-Keeper's Diary.png Biohazard-Researcher's Will & Letter.png
Researcher's Will (Torn) Orders & Fax Plant 42 Report
Biohazard-Researcher's Will (Torn).png Biohazard-Orders & Fax.png Biohazard-Plant 42 Report.png
"V-JOLT" Report Scrapbook Security System
Biohazard-V-JOLT Report.png Biohazard-Scrapbook.png Biohazard-Security System.png

The Japanese version includes background images for all files with gray-colored text over them. The international versions lack these images and have just white text on a black background and only includes the images for the Pass Number, Barry's Photo, and the Pass Codes.

Difficulty

The international versions have an adjusted difficulty.

  • Auto-aiming was disabled in the international versions.
  • Enemies have more health, both Jill and Chris have less health, and there's less ammo.
  • The player is given three ink ribbons in the Japanese version with every pickup, but only two in the international versions.

Censorship

  • Some of the more gruesome scenes in the intro were censored in the international versions.
  • The Japanese version shows Chris smoking in the cast roll and in one of the ending cutscenes.
  • The FMV played when encountering the first zombie had a shot of Kenneth Sullivan's decapitated and torn-apart head dropping to the floor in the Japanese version. This was removed from the international versions.
  • The Japanese version contains an alternative end credits cinematic where it shows the characters getting killed in various ways. To unlock it you must finish the game a second time (from a cleared save with the unlimited rocket launcher unlocked) and get a good ending.

Changed Intros

Some of the more gruesome scenes were censored in the international versions. The shot of Chris Redfield smoking during the cast roll call was censored with footage of him from the intro overlaid on him just standing there. The cast roll in the initial Japanese release also had a completely different song, "ICY GAZE" performed by the J-pop band Fumitaka Fuchigami. This was replaced with a new song for the international versions called "Terror" which doesn't feature any lyrics. All later versions of the game including the Japanese releases would use "Terror."

Changed Endings

The Japanese version of the original release also has a vocal ending theme during the credits, "Yume de Owarasenai"/"I Won't Let This End As a Dream", also by Fumitaka Fuchigami. This was replaced with a new song for the international versions​ called "Still Dawn" which doesn't feature any lyrics. All later versions of the game including the Japanese releases would use "Still Dawn."

Other Differences

  • At the Japanese version's character select screen, the difficulty level is displayed under the character (Jill is easy, Chris is hard). This text was removed from the international versions.
  • In the Japanese version, the opening FMV displays the helicopter rotor blades against the cloudy sky at the top-left corner of the screen. For some odd reason, this was mirrored in the international versions.
  • In the Japanese version, you can not skip the ending cutscenes with the helicopter or the credits, no matter how many times you beat the game.

Most of the changes listed above would be reverted in the Deadly Silence DS remake..

(Source: Rage Quitter 87)

Revisional Differences

Director's Cut

Resident Evil: Director's Cut is a revised version of the game that was released in late 1997 to fill-in for the postponed release of Resident Evil 2 as a result of its troubled development. Despite the subtitle, it doesn't really restore any missing content (such as the George Trevor letters) to the game. In fact, the U.S. version, while being advertised as "Uncut and Uncensored", still used the same censored video files as the previous U.S. release as a result of a localization mix-up (later prints of the game removed the bullet-point mentioning the uncensored footage on back of the CD case). However, it does features a slew of new content and notable changes from the original releases.

  • The Capcom opening logo video from the original version was changed to the "flashing cubes" version that was being used in their newer games at time.
  • In the Japanese version, the opening and ending songs featured in the original release have been replaced with the instrumental music used in the international versions​.
  • The game now consists of three play modes: Standard (known as Original in the Japanese version, basically the same main game as the original version), Training (known as Beginner in the Japanese version, an easier version of Standard where the amount of ammunition and ink ribbons are doubled) and Advanced (known as Arrange in the Japanese version). An easier version of Advanced mode can also be accessed by highlighting Advanced on the main menu and holding right, essentially serving as a fourth difficulty level. Advanced mode, features:
    • New room visuals/camera angles.
    • Item and enemy placement have been altered. The strength of enemy characters were also altered.
    • The default handgun was changed from a regular Beretta to what appears to be a Custom Beretta Inox, which has a higher chance of a critical hit (zombie head explosion.)
    • The default outfits for Chris and Jill, as well as Rebecca's, were changed.
    • The wardrobe room is now accessible without needing the Special Key (although the player still needs the Armor Key to get through the room leading to it). The room itself was also completely redesigned, showing the outfit options available for both, Jill and Chris, on display.
    • Forest Speyer's corpse on the 2nd floor balcony is reanimated into a zombie when the player checks his body. However, this does not happen in Jill's storyline if Barry is present.
    • Checking the mirror on the 1st floor bathroom, just as the player enters the room and before changing the camera angle, will trigger a brief scene in which a zombie is reflected in the mirror coming out from the toilet alcove. This does not happen if the player goes straight where the zombie is located, without checking the mirror first.
    • A Colt Python with unlimited ammo replaces the Special Key as the reward for getting the best ending.
    • While the Original and Beginner mode on the Japanese version's character select screen still feature the difficulty level, it is not displayed in Arrange mode.
  • Standard mode restores the original Japanese difficulty to the international versions (including Auto-Aim), otherwise all other regional differences still apply.
  • Unlike the U.S. and U.K. versions, the French and German versions do feature the uncensored opening video in color. However, the French and German versions still lacked the unedited Kenneth death scene.
  • A bonus disc was included that contains a trial version of Resident Evil 2. The Japanese version of the disc also contains a trial version of Mega Man Legends (at the time known as Rockman Neo), as well as a video trailer of Breath of Fire III.

This is the version that is available on the Japanese and European PlayStation Store, and the version included on the PlayStation Classic.

Text Differences

Art Gallery Puzzle
Bio Hazard Resident Evil Bio Hazard
Director's Cut
Resident Evil
Director's Cut
タイトルが記されている
「私に安らかなねむりを」
The title is “Give Me
Peaceful Sleep”.
タイトルが記されている
「ゆりかごから墓ばまで」
The picture is entitled.
“From cradle to grave.”


Bio Hazard Resident Evil Bio Hazard
Director's Cut
Resident Evil
Director's Cut
メッセージが記されている
「私に死の安らぎを
 あなたに生のよろこびを···」
There's a message.
“Give me the peace of
death, and I'll give you
the joy of life...”
タイトルが記されている
「人生のおわり」
The picture is entitled.
“The end of life.”

The art gallery clues were rewritten in order to make the solution easier to understand.

Pool Table Puzzle
Bio Hazard Resident Evil Bio Hazard
Director's Cut
Resident Evil
Director's Cut
まるで時計のようだ
何かの暗号だろうか···
It looks like a clock
dial.
Some kind of a code...
まるで時計のようだ
#···#·#···
何かの暗号だろうか···
It looks like a clock
dial.
#···#·#···
Some kind of a code...

Likewise, the quite confusing pool table puzzle in the guard house outright tells you the code at the end of the table in the Director's Cut.

Room Differences

Hmmm...
To do:
Need to upload some comparison screenshots of the original and revamped wardrobe rooms.

In Advanced mode, camera angles and visuals were changed in several rooms.

Lab B3
Original/Standard Arrange/Advanced
Revil lab b3-1.png Revildc lab b3-1.png
Revil lab b3-2.png Revildc lab b3-2.png
Revil lab b3-3.png Revildc lab b3-3.png
Revil lab b3-4.png Revildc lab b3-4.png
Revil lab b3-5.png Revildc lab b3-5.png
Revil lab b3-6.png Revildc lab b3-6.png
Revil lab b3-7.png Revildc lab b3-7.png
Revil lab b3-8.png Revildc lab b3-8.png

DualShock Version

Resident Evil: Director's Cut: DualShock Version, if it wasn't apparent by its ridiculously long title, is a revised edition of Resident Evil: Director's Cut (making it a revision of a revision) released in late-1998 that adds support for the newly-released at the time DualShock analog controller (a similar revision of Resident Evil 2 was released around the same period, despite the original version of that game being only a few months old). It features the following other changes as well:

  • The original soundtrack by Makoto Tomozawa, Masami Ueda, and Koichi Hiroki was notoriously replaced by a new soundtrack credited to the now-equally notorious Mamoru Samuragochi. In recent years, it would be revealed that most of Samuragochi's work, including this soundtrack, was actually ghost-written by his assistant Takashi Niigaki.
  • The end credits is always shown without the gameplay montage (the same end credits you get in the previous versions after getting one of the bad endings).
  • The different game modes, Standard, Training and Advanced, now go by their original Japanese names: Original, Beginner and Arrange.
  • Once again, the Original mode in the US release is harder than the Japanese version. (Enemies have more health, both characters have less, and ink ribbons come in sets of 2 instead of 3.)
  • The Japanese version was packaged with a bonus disc known as the Biohazard Complete Disc, which includes save data for all versions of Bio Hazard and Biohazard 2 (save data for the standard and DualShock editions of Bio Hazard: Director's Cut are cross-compatible, despite not being indicated as such). Also included was footage of the most complete build of Biohazard 1.5 with voice acting implemented, as well as the live-action cutscenes from the first game featuring performances of the previously unused Japanese voice acting. The North American version on the other hand, came with no such bonus disc and was issued directly as a "Greatest Hits" release with no prior "black label" print run. No PAL versions were produced.

This is the version that is available on the North American PlayStation Store.