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Pokémon Pinball

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This page contains changes which are not marked for translation.

Other languages:
English • ‎한국어

Title Screen

Pokémon Pinball

Developers: Jupiter, HAL Laboratory
Publisher: Nintendo
Platforms: Game Boy, Super Game Boy, Game Boy Color
Released in JP: April 14, 1999
Released in US: June 28, 1999
Released in EU: October 6, 2000
Released in AU: July 13, 1999


GraphicsIcon.png This game has unused graphics.
DebugIcon.png This game has debugging material.
RegionIcon.png This game has regional differences.


Pokémon Pinball is pinball with Pokémon. Go figure.

Unused Graphics

Unused Table?

Gbpokemonpin-table.png

A 16×16 block appearing as-is among the game's tiles, part of what may have either been a table or a simple image that wasn't used in the final. If this was going to be a table, then the center area would have likely added an object to send the ball back out or a hole for it to fall into.

Unused Pocket Monster Pictures

PokemonPinball UnusedPocketMonster1.png PokemonPinball UnusedPocketMonster2.png

These two pictures only differ by a few pixels. They were likely meant to be used in the space where map pictures or wild Pokémon pictures appeared in the lower half of the Red and Blue fields.

Unused Japanese Font

PKMNPinball-JPFont.png

Unused Debug Menu Font

PokemonPinball-UnusedFont1.png

A font used by the inaccessible debug menu described below.

Unused Debug Menu

A normally inaccessible debug menu is present in the game's code. It allows the user to run the game as either Game Boy Color or the DMG model. Since Pokémon Pinball is supported on multiple Game Boy platforms, the developers probably used this debug menu as an easy way of testing without switching physical Game Boy models. This menu was accessible by holding the Up button when turning on the game.

To enable this menu, change the byte at ROM address 0x2021 from $01 to $00. Then, hold down Up while turning on the game.

Pinball debug menu.png

Version Differences

The European version offers rumble settings and a very eye-popping Super Game Boy border. Also, language options to account for those wonderfully translated Pokémon names.

Language Select

Pokemon Pinball EU Language Select.png

The European version displays a language select option omitted from all other versions. The language screen is saved to SRAM so it cannot be accessed again.

Copyright

Japan US Europe
Pre-Y2K Pre-Y2K Post-Y2K

The US and European versions have a couple more companies incorporated than the Japanese version. The Japanese version's copyrights also have a little more space. The European copyright screen was altered to account for its later release date.

Title Screen

Japan US Europe
Over in Japan, catching 'em all is just implied. Now with extra space. CAPS LOCK IS CRUISE CONTROL FOR POKéMON!

The European version changed "Poké Dex" into the slightly more correct "POKéDEX". Additionally, Pikachu was given a smile in the international versions.

Options

Japan US Europe
Psyduck wishes he could read Japanese. If you are not with us, you are against us! Trinary is the way to go.

Besides the ability to change language, the European version also allows you to choose between "Off", "Mild", and "Strong" rumble settings, unlike the US and Japanese versions, which only had "On" and "Off". Also, the "M" in "RUMBLE" is slightly wider in the European version.

Key Config

Japan US Europe
Take control of your destiny. Why would anyone want this many choices? Why don't I have more choices?

The US and Japanese versions allow you to freely configure the control scheme. This was probably considered too confusing and was simplified into three predefined control schemes for the European version.

Super Game Boy Border

Japan US Europe
A little more effort, next time. Seriously, why did they even bother? A little more effort, next time.

The European Super Game Boy border is a little more vibrant compared to its vanilla international counterpart. Additionally, the Japanese border has no trademark (™) symbol.