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Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen

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Title Screen

Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen

Developer: Game Freak
Publisher: Nintendo
Platform: Game Boy Advance
Released in JP: January 28, 2004
Released in US: September 9, 2004
Released in EU: October 1, 2004
Released in AU: September 23, 2004


AreasIcon.png This game has unused areas.
CodeIcon.png This game has unused code.
DevTextIcon.png This game has hidden development-related text.
GraphicsIcon.png This game has unused graphics.
ItemsIcon.png This game has unused items.
TextIcon.png This game has unused text.
SoundtestIcon.png This game has a hidden sound test.
RegionIcon.png This game has regional differences.
Carts.png This game has revisional differences.


Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen are remakes of the first two Pokémon games, Red and Green. Aside from the graphics and interface being upgraded to that of Ruby and Sapphire, the games received many new elements, most notably the Sevii Islands.

Hmmm...
To do:
There may be more unused or normally unseen text. A text dump can be found here.

Sub-Pages

TextIcon.png
Untranslated Text Dump
Text found within the game that wasn't translated, implying it wasn't used.

Debugging Functionality

Hmmm...
To do:
Search for more.

Sound Test

Sound Test

At least Japanese FireRed v1.0 has a sound test, similar to the one in Ruby and Sapphire. Unlike in Ruby and Sapphire, it was removed in the localisations. To access it, patch 0x12f342 to 00 00 00 00 and 0x12f35c to 01 FF 09 08 in a Japanese FireRed v1.0 ROM to replace New Game with the sound test (this has the effect of showing the sound test after the title screen if there is no save file).

Unused Maps

Houses

  • 18.1, 27.0 and 29.0 are three identical unused houses without event data on Routes 6, 19 and 23 respectively. The one on 19 is where the Pikachu's Beach minigame was in Yellow, so it is possible that they wanted to remake it as well.
  • 31.1 is the room hidden behind boxes in the old lady's house on Seven Island. It only has a warp to the room above.
  • 31.5 is an unused house map for Seven Island that lacks event data. It's possible that this could have housed an NPC who would check how big a certain Pokémon is due to the poster on the wall.

Sevii Islands 8, 9, 22-24

Sevii Isle 8.
Sevii Isle 9.

There is data in the game for Sevii Islands 8, 9, 22, 23, and 24, as well as what are probably prototype versions of 6 and 7. Interestingly, all of their names are have different syntax than the final islands (ex. Island eight is called Sevii Island 8 rather than Eight Island.)

  • The prototype 6 and 7 are blank and only one tile big. Expanding the map size reveals one tile each of their original map intact, with collision data to boot; 6 has a surfable sea tile, and 7 has the impassible upper left corner of a sea border rock. This implies that these were fully collisioned maps at some point, but they were "deleted" in the laziest way possible.
  • 8 and 9 still have intact maps with collision data, though they are obviously incomplete.
  • 22, 23, and 24 do not have maps, only headers. They were probably cut early on in development.

Unseen Areas

The vast ocean.
The truck.
  • The area around the Trainer Tower on Seven Island has a LOT more ocean than you ever get to see in-game. What this means is anyone's guess.
  • The infamous truck near the S.S. Anne is back, and the same series of steps (getting a Pokémon with Cut without causing the S.S. Anne to leave, and returning later with Surf) are needed to access it. This time, however, there's a reward for finding the area. A Lava Cookie is out on the dock, accessible much earlier than normal.

Additional Maps

Several other maps, some of which are corrupted leftovers from Ruby and Sapphire, also exist in the game's coding. Some of these seem to be early versions of other maps in FireRed and LeafGreen, too garbled to identify, or just duplicates. A complete list can be seen on Bulbapedia, here.

Ruby and Sapphire Leftovers

Key Items

Since key items cannot be transferred with a Pokémon, they're unused and most have no effect in FireRed/LeafGreen. The Mach Bike and Acro Bike do work, but act like the normal Bicycle. HM08 (Dive) also works and can be taught to Pokémon, but unlike normal HMs the move can be deleted freely.

Trainer Sprites

A lot: Archie and Team Aqua, Maxie and Team Magma, Beauties, Cyclists, Hex Maniacs, Gym Leaders, the Elite Four and Champion, etc. While you can battle them in-game through hacking, their Pokémon data is gone, so they don't have any Pokémon to battle with.

Weather Effects

Several weather effects are leftovers from Ruby and Sapphire:

  • Rainy weather
  • Rain with thunderstorm
  • Heavy rain with thunderstorm
  • Sunny weather with clouds in water
  • Three snowflakes (unused)
  • Steady snowing (unused)
  • Sandstorm
  • Mist from top-right corner
  • Dense bright mist
  • Underground flashes
  • Underwater mist

Scripts

Multiple scripts starting at 0x1638EC in the US 1.0 version remain as leftovers from the first Braille chamber, with the alphabet inscribed in pairs of three (ABC, DEF, GHI ...). A room similar to it was likely planned but then scrapped in favor of having a Braille table included in the booklet.

Unused Text

While not technically unused, this text requires cheating to be seen. If the player interacts with the TV on the ground floor of his/her house from the sides or the back, the same text string from Pokémon Red and Blue appears.

Oops, wrong side...

Unused Sprites

Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen Bug-type TM.png

Hacking a TM move to be Bug-type will cause the disc in the TM case to change color accordingly, suggesting that Bug-type TMs were originally planned to appear in Generation III (though it's a bright shade of yellow, rather than green as it is in later games). Colors for nonexistent HM types also exist; however, ???-type has no color, and defaults to Normal-type.

Unused Overworld Sprites

Pokémon

These Pokémon overworld sprites are never used in-game.

Sprite Pokémon
PKMN FRLG Mew.PNG Mew
PKMN FRLG Raikou.PNG Raikou
PKMN FRLG Entei.PNG Entei
PKMN FRLG Suicune.PNG Suicune
PKMN FRLG Celebi.PNG Celebi
PKMN FRLG Deoxys-A.PNG Deoxys Attack form
PKMN FRLG Deoxys-D.PNG Deoxys Defense form

Surfing

Hmmm...
To do:
Keitaro posted this on the Jul forums. Investigate and document this further.
PKMN FRLG UnusedOWSurf Spriteset.png

There are unused sprites for the player surfing that use a Lapras-like blob instead of the generic blob from Ruby and Sapphire that ended up being used in the final release.

Shiny Celebi

Pokemon Ruby Sapphire Shiny Celebi.png

For the sake of consistency, every Pokémon in every Pokémon game is given a Shiny variant, and Celebi is no exception. However, because the only way to obtain it legitimately was through distributions, the Shiny version of Celebi was left unobtainable through normal means. This sprite may still be seen (in a lighter hue) if a Shiny Pokémon Transforms into a Celebi.

Like "standard" Celebi and many other Pokémon, the sprite is identical to that of Ruby and Sapphire, where it was similarly unobtainable.

Altering Cave

Altering Cave appears in FireRed, LeafGreen, and Emerald. Normally, only Zubat can be found in this cave, however there are other wild Pokémon that can be found if Mystery Gift is used at an official Nintendo "Wonder Spot". Despite this, no such event has been held in any country. The Pokémon that were supposed to be found were Mareep, Aipom, Pineco, Shuckle, Teddiursa, Houndour, Stantler, and Smeargle.

The plan was probably scrapped because these Pokémon could be obtained by trading with Pokémon Colosseum, Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness, and/or found in Emerald's extended area of the Safari Zone (except Smeargle, which is found in Artisan Cave instead).

There's also unused text for the Mystery Gift reception of the event-only Pokémon.

Thank you for using the MYSTERY
GIFT System.

Recently, there have been rumors
of rare POKéMON appearances.

The rumors are about ALTERING
CAVE on OUTCAST ISLAND.

Why not visit there and check if
the rumors are indeed true?

Unused Code

Hmmm...
To do:
Isn't this in Ruby and Sapphire?

Diagonal Movement

At 3A64C8 the movement table is located, containing the directions the player or an NPC must move in. However, after the first five entries (steady, down, up, left, right), four more follow, resulting in diagonal movement when activated. Using them results in some glitches with warps and map rendering. This feature was not implemented in any final version until X and Y.

Wild Double Battles

Some data suggests wild double battles were originally planned for this generation, but were delayed until Generation IV. For example, a string Wild [buffer1] and [buffer2] appeared! is located at 3fd2bf, and setting only bit 0 in the battle type flag at 02022b4c in the RAM results in such a battle, if used at the right moment. As with the previous feature, it isn't finished and may result in some bugs.

Build Dates

version FireRed
location
LeafGreen
location
ASCII string
Japanese v1.0 0x1CDE34 0x1CDE10
2003 12 29 23:17
Japanese v1.1 0x1C9704 0x1C96E0
2004 03 01 16:45
US/English v1.0 0x1E9F14 0x1E9EF0
2004 04 26 11:20
US/English v1.1 0x1E9F84 0x1E9F60
2004 07 20 09:30
Spanish 0x1E575C 0x1E5738
2004 07 20 15:50
French 0x1E43FC 0x1E43D8
2004 07 21 13:50
German 0x1E9EC0 0x1E9E9C
2004 07 26 17:40
Italian 0x1E3094 0x1E3070

Build Information

Hmmm...
To do:
There's more source paths, and more interesting text.

Near the build date info is a plain-text string showing the build path and a few build variables. The Japanese 1.0 revisions use relative paths instead of the full paths, both the English revisions (1.0, 1.1) have this line in full, and the Japanese 1.1 revisions no longer have this information.

  • FireRed JP 1.0 (location 1CDE8A) and LeafGreen JP 1.0 (location 1CDE66):
../gflib/malloc.c
 0
 p != NULL
 pos->magic_number == MALLOC_SYSTEM_ID
 pos->flag == TRUE
 pos->next->magic_number == MALLOC_SYSTEM_ID
 pos->prev->magic_number == MALLOC_SYSTEM_ID
  • FireRed US 1.0 (location 1E9F68), LeafGreen US 1.0 (location 1E9F44), FireRed US 1.1 (location 1E9FD8), and LeafGreen US 1.1 (location 1E9FB4):
C:/WORK/POKeFRLG/src/pm_lgfr_ose/source/gflib/malloc.c
 0
 p != NULL
 pos->magic_number == MALLOC_SYSTEM_ID
 pos->flag == TRUE
 pos->next->magic_number == MALLOC_SYSTEM_ID
 pos->prev->magic_number == MALLOC_SYSTEM_ID

Revisional Differences

  • Version 1.0 of the American release does not show "PRESENTS" on the Game Freak logo screen, although the tile graphics are present in the ROM. This was likely due to a bug introduced during the localization process, as the original Japanese versions do display this.
US 1.0 US 1.1
EnglishV1.0FireredGameFreakLogo.png EnglishV1.1FireredGameFreakLogo.png
  • In v1.0, species names in the Pokédex only display the first word due to a bug. For example, Pidgey's species name is listed as "Tiny" rather than "Tiny Bird".

Regional Differences

Title Screen

Other than the logo graphics being altered (resulting in Charizard/Venusaur being moved down), the Japanese versions have "PUSH START BUTTON" at the top while the English ones use "PRESS START" in the lower-middle-left side.

The Japanese versions format Game Freak's name as "GAMEFREAK inc.", which is occasionally used by the company; the international releases instead use the regular "GAME FREAK inc." formatting of the name.

Japanese English
Japanese-FireredTitleScreen.png English-FireredTitleScreen.png
Japanese-LeafGreenTitleScreen.png English-LeafGreenTitleScreen.png

Name Entry Screen

The Japanese versions' name entry screen allows for five-character names with hiragana, katakana, and alphabet tables. The English versions allow for seven-character names with uppercase, lowercase, and symbol tables.

Japanese English
Japanese-FireredNameEntry.png English-FireredNameEntry.png
Japanese-FireredNameEntry2.png English-FireredNameEntry2.png
Japanese-FireredNameEntry3.png English-FireredNameEntry3.png

Bedroom

The player's bedroom has a Famicom in the Japanese version, but a front-loader NES in the international versions. The dialogue text displayed when pressing the A button in front of it was also changed in order to reflect this.

Japanese International
Japanese-FireredBedroom.png English-FireredBedroom.png

Battles

The Japanese versions use a font for the "Lv." text and numbers which are very similar to those of the original Red and Green. The localizations change these to the same font as everything else and move the "Lv." to the right edge of the box due to the longer Western words.

The "♂" and "♀" symbols were also changed slightly.

Japanese International
Japanese-FireredFemaleMale.png English-FireredFemaleMale.png

Text

Female Male
Japanese-FireredSaveFemale.png Japanese-FireredSaveMale.png

The Japanese version uses pink or blue text on the title screen menu for the player's progress entry, depending on their gender.

Japanese International
Japanese-FireredFemaleTalk.png English-FireredFemaleTalk.png
Japanese-FireredMaleTalk.png English-FireredMaleTalk.png

The Japanese versions use black text when talking to people. The fonts used are slightly different between male and female NPC dialogue: for female NPCs, a slightly more wiggly, handwriting-esque font is used, while the font for male NPCs has a more "perfect" modern computer-ish look. For example, compare the か and の characters in the sample screenshots.

The international versions use the pink and blue text when talking to female and male NPCs, respectively. This was also seen in some pre-release media of the Japanese version.

Poké Mart and Pokémon Center Signs

Japanese English French / Spanish German / Italian
PC SHOP PC MART POKE SHOP POKE MRKT

Trainer Tower

In the Japanese version, Trainer Tower was used to fight trainers downloaded from Pokémon Battle-e FireRed & LeafGreen cards. These cards were not released outside of Japan, and so the e-Reader compatibility was stripped from the US and European versions. Trainer Tower became an area similar to the Battle Tower in Ruby and Sapphire, with the majority of the trainers from the e-Cards integrated into the game itself.

Seven Island House

Ever wondered what that door in the house on Seven Island that had boxes over it was used for? In the Japanese version, the old woman hosted battles with trainers after players used the Mystery Gift, an element which was not carried over to the international versions.

Hmmm...
To do:
Take screenshots of this.

Infinite Nugget Glitch

In the Japanese and English releases of FireRed and LeafGreen, there is a glitch that makes it possible to obtain infinite Nuggets in Route 24. The Team Rocket Grunt that is at the end of Nugget Bridge gives the player a Nugget prior to battling. However, each time the player loses against the Rocket Grunt, he or she is given another chance to battle the Team Rocket Grunt; he gives out a Nugget each time he battles the player.

In the European releases, this was fixed so the player only has one chance to fight the Rocket Grunt, regardless of the outcome. This is also the behavior in the original Game Boy games.